Mercenary Armies in Middle East

IRAQ; a Middle Eastern country whose oil riches are estimated to potentially be the largest in the world and which are predominantly leased to Canada, the US, UK, France, Australia, Russia and a spattering of EU countries. Nine of the world’s most powerful mercenary armies are tasked with Iraqi oil property protection; G4S, Unity Resources Group, Erinys, Asia Security Group, DynCorp, Triple Canopy, Aegis Defense Services, Defion International and Academi.

Most of these mercenaries receive funding from the US State Department.

Since the invasion of Iraq in 2003, the toppling of Saddam Hussein, and the administration of the Coalition Provisional Authority under Paul Bremer, the US government, and by defacto, the CIA, has controlled every aspect of Iraq, including it’s oil.

Under Bremer, the B’aath Party under which Hussein ruled was eliminated, culled… its members fled persecution or were faced with assassination.   Both Sunni and Shia militia groups formed to fight the US rule of Iraq. One such group was led by Abu Musad al-Zarqawi, who later became one of Osama Bin Laden’s masterminds.

Bremer, in coalition with the CIA and an Iranian military officer, Soleimani, turned power over to Shia, Nouri al-Maliki in 2006 as Prime Minister.   Soliemani was later sanctioned by the US government for supporting the Syrian government and Assad who also worked alongside the US prior to the invasion of Iraq and suddenly now became a targeted – bad guy…

Al-Maliki fell out of favor with the US and in 2014, Fuad Masum, a Communist politician who later joined the Kurdistan Democratic Party, was secretly made President by Ban-Ki-Moon of the UN and Kurdish MP’s.   He ousted Maliki and appointed Haider al-Abadi as the new Prime Minister.

Abadi’s education and early work life was conducted in the UK, where he worked in the ‘transportation industry’. Under his rule, the once majority Shia party was quelled as he introduced more Sunni’s into the government per the US and EU advisory. But Abadi became critical of Obama and shifted alliance from the US to Russia and Iran.

This shift put a strain on US control of the oil reserves in Iraq and calls for mercenaries to destabilize Iraq’s government were ramped up. These mercenaries operate via multi-million and billion dollar contracts and became the de facto armies representing various nations across the globe including the US, Australia, Europe and Canada. The oil companies, Shell, Mobil, BP, Total, Chevron, Hess, Dragon, as well as a number from China, Turkey and Indonesia, were in competition with Rosneft and Gazprom from Russia.

Wagner Mercenaries provide the Russian government with their unchartered, unregulated army, and are most likely in Iraq as well protecting Russia’s oil interests.

Meanwhile, the acknowledged militaries are at the mercy of commands and commanders that are at the mercy of the unregulated…operating in missions that are convoluted, corrupted, and – staged.

The footprint in the Middle East, the assassination of Saddam and the subsequent rise of ISIS wreaked havoc on a plan that backfired 15 years ago with the initial invasion of Iraq. Attempting to ‘cleanup’ the mess, Syria and Yemen became the next targets as US and European interests in the Middle East erupted into chaos.

Blackmailed into the ethnic cleansing of Shiites, and anyone not Sunni, the block of power brokers including Saudi Arabia, Qatar, Bahrain, Kuwait, Oman, have invoked an all out war in the Middle East with the US and EU acting as proxy. The blackmail? To continue to allow the US control of Iraq. In return we give them Syria and Yemen. Iran is up for grabs… And Turkey?

Turkey became fearful when Assad, the US and Russia began backing the Kurds. Should the Kurds gain a foothold in Syria, Erdogan fears the Turkish Kurds, which represent roughly 20% of the population, would be emboldened and demand civil rights. Turkey is thus indirectly supporting – ISIL.

The war is far from over with continued propaganda statements of chemical attacks and bombings on civilians.   For now, some are proposing a ‘protectorate’ of forces, policed by troops from ‘many nations’ in which separate states will be imposed within Iraq and Syria housing Sunni’s, Shites, and Kurds.  

Not unlike dividing Palestine and Israel, I imagine the people of Syria and Iraq will not be too thrilled.

Palestinians Shunned – a reason?

Why are Palestinians shunned?  It is not just Israel, it is everywhere in the Middle East, their brothers and sisters.  Palestinians were originally defined as people that lived along the coastline of the Mediterranean on the land that is now Israel.  They were Arab, Jewish and Christian.  Most of the Christians fled to South America.  As the Jewish people were pushed from their lands in Iraq, Syria, Iran, Lebanon, etc… they fled to ‘Israel’.  Albeit the population grew because they had nowhere else to go.  But the Palestinians have nowhere else to go now either.  No one wants them.  They are refugees everywhere.

So, why does the media concentrate only on Palestinians within Israel? There are approximately 1.3 million Palestinians in Israel, 3.3 million in Jordan, 500,000 in Chile, 430,000 in Syria, 400,000 in Lebanon, 330,000 in Saudi Arabia, 225,000 in North and South America, 44,000 in Egypt, 40,000 in Kuwait, 310,000 in ‘other Arab states, and 308,000 in ‘other countries’.

Exactly how do they fair when in their Arab brother countries?

In Jordan and Syria, most Palestinian refugees have been integrated into society; however, in Jordan, only Palestinian refugees displaced by the 1948 War have Jordanian citizenship and enjoy largely favorable treatment on par with Jordanian nationals. Refugees from the Gaza Strip who did not hold Jordanian passports at the time of their flight in 1967 have been denied citizenship and are mostly confined to the “Jerash” camp. In Syria, Palestinian refugees have not been granted citizenship but have been accorded equal treatment with Syrian nationals in almost all respects. Palestinian refugees in Lebanon have fared considerably worse; sectarian tensions and the activities of the PLO have prevented their integration into Lebanese society. The majority of Palestinian refugees in Lebanon live in UNRWA refugee camps or other unofficial camps and shelters, often in conditions of abject poverty. They face restrictions on their right to work, access to education and healthcare, and ownership of property. Only those displaced in 1948 have residency rights in Lebanon whereas all other Palestinian refugees are deemed illegal immigrants.

Outside of the Operation Areas, Palestinian refugees face even more of a precarious existence.

In Egypt, Palestinian refugees are treated as foreigners and face significant restrictions on their ability to access education, government services, and employment. Renewal of residency permits is difficult and there are reports of frequent detention of Palestinian refugees by the authorities in Egypt. Iraq, once a refuge for Palestinian refugees, has now become a country of persecution; many Palestinians were targeted in, and fled from, Iraq following the fall of the Saddam Hussein regime.

In the Gulf States, particularly Kuwait, Palestinians are treated as foreign migrant workers with no permanent residency rights.

Approximately 59% of the population reside in refugee camps:

In Gaza there are approximately 1.2 million ‘registered’ refugees.

West Bank – 740,000

Syria – 500,000

Lebanon – 450,000

Jordan – 2 million

The discrepancy in populations verses registered refugees is huge. But foreign aid is based on refugee count, not population. Which opens another topic – how much money is funnelled to the Palestinians annually? By whom? And where is it spent? Have they built schools and hospitals and industry? Have they built roads and water systems and farmed crops? Do they make clothes and build homes and temples?  Or are they a welfare state wherein they do – nothing?

We constantly talk of their ‘plight’, their losses, their poverty, their poor conditions, but what has changed since they became refugees?  Those that lived in Palestine lost their homes in 1948, they were evicted by the UK.  Nearly 60 years of ‘aid’ has absolutely nothing to show for it.  Once again, welfare produces nothing.  It doesn’t ‘lift’ people out of poverty, instead it creates even greater poverty.   There is one notable exception to Palestinian refugees.  Those that fled to Chile worked the fields, made goods, sold products – and prospered.   It was hard, damn hard, but they had no choice and so they lifted themselves up.  These Palestinians were all Christian. They took no handouts, no UNRWA funding, no governmental aid. They didn’t live in refugee camps, they are well educated and have risen above their plight.

In 1950 when aid began pouring in to the Middle East, it supported about 750,000 ‘refugees’. Today the number is 5 million and growing without restriction. All children, grandchildren down the line of eternity – are grandfathered in. It is a shambles. The one example of UNRWA schools and medical facilities for the Palestinians is in a town outside of Damascus. But we obliterated Damascus, it lies in rubble. So much for that. Syrian refugees from Palestine became refugees once again after the country was bombed and Al Nusra and ISIS took over. Most fled to Jordan where they idle in camps in dire need of attention.

No one in the camps work. They are not required to and have little to no supportive education to enable them to work. It is the supreme example of pouring money down the drain of entitlement without creating a self sufficiency of production. Sixty years worth of nothing.

But why do the Arabs hate them so much? One theory is that the Palestinians have a knack for ingratiating themselves in their host country. Perhaps out of boredom, perhaps out of a need to feel a cause, or a purpose, whatever it is, Palestinians typically find themselves on the losing side of a civil uprising whether in Jordan, Iraq, Kuwait or wherever.

Lesson: no one likes an ingratiating bully…

Sister Diana Momeka – Christian Persecution

Iraqi Christians, Egyptian Christians, Syrian Christians – what do they have in common?

In a sense they were all protected by their countries dictators, Saddam Hussein, Mubarek and Assad. They were protected not necessarily because they were Christian, but because it was the law of the land to quell all violence and ethnic cleansing which has occurred since those dictators rule was felled. Hussein and Mubarek gave protection in return for support, but Assad was actually closer to a benefactor of the Christians. In fact, according to Andrew Tabler of The Washington Institute, Syrian Christians were some of the most devout supporters of Assad as they provided a bridge to international relationships. It may even have been this ‘bridge’ that gave Assad the support of Putin, an Orthodox Christian.

With the fall of each of these dictators, the Christian population immediately became target for cleansing by the newly placed de-facto governments as well as by ISIS and Al Qaeda. Their populations in all three countries have been sliced in half or more since the ousting of the quasi sympatheric dictatorships. While these dictators perpetrated heinous acts of human rights violations, what was then and what is now is even more fascist.

Taking out the dictators and sending these countries into an internal civil spiral without authoritarian rule, was akin to laying open the gate for the Trojan Horse to enter. Only inside this Trojan Horse were the greater evil, the blackest hearts to raze the land and it’s people without hesitation. It is parallel to the conquering during the time of Muhammed only larger, more grave, more filled with hatred. It is the paradigm of rule. While under Saddam’s rule it is estimated that upward of 100,000 to 180,000 civilians were executed. After Hussein was toppled the timeline is fettered with death; suicide bombs, guerrilla war, Shi’a leader killed, suicide bomber at Red cross and Police Headquarters during Ramadan, US helicopter downed, Italian troops killed, Irbil suicide bombs, police station attacked, massacre on Shi’a Holy Day, US contractors killed, Shi’a uprisings, US bombs Falluja Mosque, Basra attacks, prisoner abuse charges, beheadings, scores killed in Bacuba bombing, Iraqi army recruits killed, attack on US base in Mosul, on and on and on.

By July 2006, four years after ousting Saddam, over 110,000-180,000 ‘civilians’ had been killed in Iraq, according to the official count by the Iraqi Ministry of Health. Many claim this figure is low, but at what point is the number not relative? What is the allowed collateral in a war invoked by one nation to ‘free’ another.

Sister Diana Momeka was slated to testify before Congress along with a delegation from Iraq on the systemic persecution of Iraqi Christians. Despite her original invitation, her passage was revoked when the State Department, John Kerry, decided that she posed a flight risk. In other words, given that she was considered a ‘displaced citizen’ as a result of the infighting in Iraq, she was a threat on American soil.

In 2009, Sister Momeka was living in the US and recounted bombings of churches in Iraq. Seven churches were bombed during 2004 and 2005 while filled with Christian worshipers. Rapes, executions, beheadings, became a way of life after 2003. She said that the people initially looked forward to freedom, but had no idea what that would look like until it was upon them. She lost four cousins and a brother, killed not just by the Islamists but by US soldiers as well.

According to Sister Momeka, 2 million Iraqi’s were displaced inside Iraq without jobs or food after Saddam’s ousting, 5 million fled Iraq and there are now over 1 million widows as a result of fighting. Prior to the war, she said that Muslims and Christians lived side by side without distrust, without persecution, without judgement.

As of 2000, the religious demographics of Iraq was about 63% Shi’a, 32% Sunni and 3% Christian. Today the Christian population represents .8%.

Of course the question begs, why would the US State Department be afraid of the testimony of this nun? What could she possibly say that might be cause for embarrassment, or worse truth?

Given the mainstream media has squelched the story, it also opens the discussion as to what information with regard to Iraq is muffled and altered to fit a preconceived vision?

These countries have been taken over by Al Nusra, Al Qaeda and ISIS. These countries have been targeted by the US. These countries are seeing an unprecedented cleansing of Christians. Why is that not important enough to address?

Stats: between 322 and 800 Christians are murdered each month for being Christian – 214 Christian properties destroyed – 722 Christians are targeted by violence.  These numbers are guesstimates, the Vatican and others put these numbers significantly higher.

Weapons – Here, There and Everywhere

The US keeps giving away weapons to just about anyone asking. Unfortunately, it appears we frequently give them to countries that we think are or might be an ally, only to find that we go to war with that country at some future date – against our own weapons.

The latest is of course, Iraq.

In 1982 the US armed Saddam Hussein in Iraq’s fight against Iran. Iraq instigated the war with Iran. It is estimated that anywhere from ½ million to one million people died in that war. Another ½ million became permanent invalids. Over $228 billion was spent and the end result was over $400 billion in damage. The war included indiscriminate missile attacks on cities and civilians. It included the extensive use of chemical weapons. The major sources of the chemicals were DOW Chemical, and the US Department of Commerce. The US, Saudi Arabia and Kuwait aided Saddam Hussein.

The end of this war led to the Gulf War. Saddam Hussein ordered the invasion of Kuwait this time. The same country that had been an ally against Iran. Of course, this time the US was on the side of Kuwait – fighting against weapons provided to Saddam by the US in the 1980’s. The precipitating factor – oil. Saddam thought that Kuwait and the Saudis were siphoning his oil and therefore wanted to cancel out a $30 billion debt. Saudi Arabia ‘asked’ the US for military intervention. This time, weapons were given to Kuwait. Chemical weapons used by Iraq against Iran are now being used against US military.

Upwards of 30% of the weapons provided to Iraq could not be accounted for. It is presumed they found their way to various terrorist factions, including ISIS.

The Afghanistan war found our US military facing off against weapons provided to them during the 1980’s when we allied with them against the Soviets.

IN 2008, the US supplied weapons to Uganda and Burundi, half of which ended up in the hands of Al-Shabaab. Al-Shabaab is a jihadist terrorist group that has pledged allegiance to Al-Qaeda.

In 2012, weapons sent to Qatar and the UAE ended up in the hands of Islamic militants in Libya.

Weapons sent to Syria in support of the rebels fighting against Asad ended up in the hands of ISIS, including weapons parachuted into the country meant for the Kurds.

And now Iraq’s Prime Minister is seeking a ‘sustainable flow of weapons’ from the US with payment ‘deferred’ given the oil price crisis has damaged their economy.

It would seem that we do not learn from our past mistakes, instead we insist that this time … ‘they promised’. In fact we supply quite a hefty load of weapons to Middle East countries including:

UAE $3.7billion

Turkey $2.3billion

Afghanistan $1.06billion

Egypt $976million

Iraq $916million

Saudi Arabia $1billion

Oman $130million

Kuwait $107million

And the list goes on ad nauseam.

When these weapons turn up in the hands of El Nusra, Al Shabaad, Al Qaeda, ISIS, and even Boko Haram, suddenly everyone is mute. US weapons in the hands of Al-Qaeda in Yemen brings shrugs and California valley girl, ”whatever’s’. The oops factor.

Who has nuclear weapons? Russia, China, UK, US, France, Pakistan, India, and Israel are known to possess nuclear weapons. It is a possibility that North Korea, and Iran have a bomb. Countries that have nuclear weapon fuel Kazakhstan, Germany, The Netherlands, Canada, Belgium, Belarus, Japan, Italy, Poland and South Africa.

Saudi Arabia has signed a pact with Pakistan that it will fund their nuclear development and in return Pakistan will provide the Saudis with nuclear warheads. Other Middle East countries pursuing nuclear power include; Turkey, UAE, Jordan, Egypt, Kuwait, Algeria, and Morocco.

Are we concerned?